Tour the Week-long Unit

The following provides in greater detail the teaching plan for the unit along with each module's highlights.


 
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Monday: Module 1- The Contemporary Lens

1. Film Viewing Preparation - time:  5 min.

2. Show Film - 3rd World Canada: 46 min.

3. De-brief & discussion: 20 min.

4. Take-home assignments: 4 min.

Total: 75 minutes


Tuesday: Module 2-The Colonial Lens of History

1. Acknowledge First Nations territory: 2 mins

2. Film discussion & teach : ‘powerful questions’: 10 min.

3. Have students move desks in a circle: 2 min.

4. Teach : ‘Critical thinking': 5 min.

5. Present: PPT #1: The colonial lens of history: 20 min.

7. Present : PowerPoint #2 Wampum Belt Teachings: 15 min.

8. Present : Ted Talk – Honour the Treaties: 15 min.

Total: 75 minutes

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Wednesday: Module 3- We Are All Treaty People

1. Teach ‘Historical Significance’: 2 min.

2. Present PPT #3 We are All Treaty People: 15 min.

3. Teach ‘Cause & Consequence’: 2 min.

4. Present PPT #4 ‘What is Reconciliation in Canada?': 15 min.

5. Present video ‘It’s Our Time’: 6 min.

7. Group project work time in class:  35 min. 

Total: 75 minutes


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Thursday: Module 4a - Reconciliation & Restitution

1. Group presentations: 60 min.

2. Teach: Continuity & Change: 2 min.

3. Prepare students for the last day of the Unit: 5 min.

4. Teacher presents Powerpoint #5: 8 min.

Total: 75 minutes


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Friday: Module 4b- Reconciliation & Restitution

1. Student acknowledge territory: 1 min.

2. Teach the ‘Ethical Dimension’: 2 min.

3. Present PowerPoint #6 -Restitution in Canada: 6 min.

4. Brainstorm: Reconciliation in the school: 15 min.

5. Talking circle & Powerful questions: 50 min.

6. Post a First Nations flag to close the Unit:  1 min.

Total: 75 minutes


HIGHLIGHTS & ELEMENTS OF THE UNIT:

Multimedia elements:

PSAC has been working to protect and defend the rights of Aboriginal Peoples in Canada and abroad for decades.

Aaron Huey's effort to photograph poverty in America led him to the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, where the struggle of the native Lakota people — appalling, and largely ignored — compelled him to refocus. Five years of work later, his haunting photos intertwine with a shocking history lesson.

Aaron Huey's effort to photograph poverty in America led him to the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, where the struggle of the native Lakota people — appalling, and largely ignored — compelled him to refocus. Five years of work later, his haunting photos intertwine with a shocking history lesson.